Does refinancing hurt credit?

Refinancing will hurt your credit score a bit initially, but it could actually help in the long run. Usually, your score will drop a few points, but you can recover within a few months.

Does refinancing hurt credit?

Refinancing will hurt your credit score a bit initially, but it could actually help in the long run. Usually, your score will drop a few points, but you can recover within a few months. Refinancing may seem like a good option, but how exactly does refinancing harm your credit? In short, refinancing can temporarily lower your credit rating. As a reminder, the main loan-related factors that affect credit scores are credit inquiries and changes in loan balances and terms.

It's good to know how refinancing affects your credit rating before you do so. Above all, carefully consider the benefits of refinancing so you can decide if it's the best option for your situation. A mortgage refinance raises difficult questions, shortens your credit history and can increase your debt burden. These factors may temporarily lower your credit scores.

Refinancing and loan modifications may temporarily lower your FICO scores in some areas, but they can save you money with a lower monthly payment. The extent to which a score is affected depends on how it is reported and on the additional information in your credit report. If you notice that your refinance loan causes alarming changes when you check your credit rating, be sure to contact your creditor or consider filing a dispute. The extent to which your credit score is affected by changes in loan balances and terms depends on whether your refinanced loan is reported to credit bureaus.

Before you apply for a refinance loan, check your credit score to find out what your situation is before lenders ask difficult questions about your credit. As with other types of loans, it's best to refinance a personal loan if your credit score has improved since the original loan was processed and you're likely to qualify for a better interest rate. Every time you refinance a loan, your credit score will temporarily decline, not only because of the tough consultation about your credit report, but also because you're applying for a new loan and haven't yet demonstrated your ability to repay it. Even with the possibility that your credit may be affected, the benefits of refinancing your mortgage can more than offset it.

Your credit score may decline slightly initially after refinancing, but only for a short period of time. Refinancing a mortgage, car loan, or other debt can be an effective way to access a lower interest rate or lower your monthly payment. If you prefer not to lower your credit rating to refinance a mortgage, an alternative is to recast your home loan. You may also want to refinance to consolidate several personal loans into a single, larger personal loan.

If you're planning to refinance a personal loan or other debt in the near future, take steps to strengthen your credit, so you're more likely to qualify for a competitive interest rate. However, if you're using a new personal loan to refinance more than an existing personal loan, you'll have fewer open accounts with outstanding balances, which can help improve your credit score. While you may have plans to buy a new car and fill your house with furniture, it's best to avoid using credit until after you close the refinance loan.

Rosanne Axtell
Rosanne Axtell

An animal lover. Infuriatingly humble pop culture aficionado. Incurable social media advocate. Unapologetic web expert.

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